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Battle of Thersuis

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The Battle of Thersuis was a battle fought between the Dark Eldar and Imperium in 967.M41.[1]

Overview

Dark Eldar from the Kabal of the Black Heart burst from the Webway to launch a realspace slave raid on the hapless population of the world of Thersuis. The raid is powerful and well-funded, featuring the cream of Commorragh's fighting elite, including the illustrious Queen of Slaughter, Lelith Hesperax. The planet's defenders stand little chance, and many thousands of humans are captured within only hours of the raid beginning. Yet the Dark Eldar have a greater quarry in mind. A large Black Templar fleet is rearming in close proximity to the Thersius System, and swiftly responds to the planet's cries for aid. Led by none other than High Marshal Helbrecht, the Black Templars soon engage the xenos forces with all of their renowned fury, but in doing so, fall into a cunningly-contrived trap. Seeking a worthy challenger to pit against his gladiatorial champions in the arenas of Commorragh , Asdrubael Vect had engineered the entire raid from behind the scenes to draw forth the Black Templars and capture Helbrecht.[1]

As the High Marshal gives battle, Lelith Hesperax leads the strike force tasked with abducting him. Despite bloodily repulsing the Dark Eldar slavers, Helbrecht is finally laid low by the skills of Commorragh's gladiator queen. Yet even as Helbrecht's superhuman strength succumbs to the poison blades of his would-be captor, he hears are roaring flames and alien screams. Upon his recovery, Helbrecht is informed by his Sword Brethren of his redemption at the hands of a ghostly brotherhood, who arrived as if from nowhere to drive the Dark Eldar from the field. Even the blades of Lelith Hesperax could find no purchase on the spectral forms of Helbrecht's saviors, and she was forced to retreat without her prize or share the fate of her kin that were being slaughtered by the Legion of the Damned.[1]

Sources