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Solomon Voss

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Solomon Voss was a remembrancer active during the Great Crusade and the early days of the Horus Heresy.[1]


Biography

Solomon was famous for writing The Edge of Illumination and was said to be the "finest wordsmith of the age".[1]

He was found on a traitor ship that was mysteriously sent into the Sol System, after it was assaulted and secured by the Imperial Fists. Upon being found in the bay of the ship he introduced himself as "the last remembrancer".[1]

He was taken to the most secure prison in the Imperium, Titan. Now reserved for the interrogation and execution of traitors and turncoats, when Solomon was brought into the fortress he was questioned by no other than Rogal Dorn and Iacton Qruze.[1]

Solomon told them that he and some other remembrancers, including Askarid Sha, had defied the cessation order on the activities of remembrancers and had gone to Isstvan V to investigate and document the happenings there, but were captured and taken aboard Horus's flagship the Vengeful Spirit. Brought before Horus himself, the leader of the traitors ordered all but Solomon killed on the spot. Solomon was then ordered by Horus to continue doing his job as a remembrancer, but for Horus's forces instead.[1]

During his time with Horus he was never harmed and continued his work, but later reckoned that he had gone insane, at least for a time. When being questioned by Dorn he said "the future is dead, Rogal Dorn. It is ashes running through our hands". Dorn then flew into a rage and called him a liar and said that they would defeat Horus. To which Solomon said that they may, but they could never rebuild the Imperium as they no longer have trust. Furthermore, he told Dorn that if he had nothing to fear then why won't he let his works on what he saw while with Horus be published. Dorn then left the room.[1]

Dorn later returned and with Iacton's sword executed Solomon and ordered his works burnt.[1]

Sources