Welcome to Warhammer 40k - Lexicanum! Log in and join the community.

Minerva

From Warhammer 40k - Lexicanum
Jump to: navigation, search

Minerva is a Civilised World and the homeworld of the Minervan Tank Legions.[1]

Map Basic Data Planetary Image
Galaxy-Rift-Solar.jpg
Small cross.pngArmageddon
Name: Minerva Unknown.jpg
Segmentum: Segmentum Solar[3b]
Sector: Armageddon Sector[2]
Subsector: Armageddon Subsector[2]
System: Unknown
Population: Unknown
Affiliation: Imperium [1]
Class: Civilised World [1]
Tithe Grade: Unknown

History

Minerva was first colonised by the Imperium in M37. Shortly after the planet was invaded by Chaos renegades under the command of the Sorcerer Lord Torvel the Deluded. The invaders were driven off by the massed armoured tanks of the Armageddon 1st Steel Legion Regiment, with Torvel being slain by Commissar Orthos. The 1st Steel Legion were given Right of Conquest over Minerva, with Colonel Mantubb appointed Planetary Governor. Mantubb shaped Minerva into an industrial-based world exporting weapons and armoured vehicles to neighbouring Imperial worlds.[1]

Over the millennia Minerva has continued to grow as an industrial centre. It now has seven large, sprawling cities, and the industrial capacity to raise an entire Tank Legion every four years in addition to its other trade commitments. The quality of Minerva's machine shops in second only to those of Armageddon. This has come at the cost of reducing much of the planet's natural environment to ash. Some Imperial scholars predict that within a few thousand years Minerva will become a productive Hive World, perhaps even rivalling Armageddon for strategic importance.[1]

In 998.M41, Minerva was recorded as being blockaded by Ork pirates.[2] The following year, in 3978999.M41, the Ork hordes on Minerva were decimated by the guns of the Armageddon 45th Heavy Artillery Regiment. Each artillery shell was inscribed with the name of a martyr of Hades Hive in the belief that this would give the spirits of the fallen a measure of vengeance.[3a]

Sources